When Betsy applied for a position as an assembly line trainee at Max's factory, she stood as much chance of getting the job as did at getting elected Ms. America.

She had pre-school aged children at home and, as Max put it, he wasn't going to hire any broad with a brood.

Turned down for the job, Betsy assumed her battling mode in court.

"If I know anything about my rights," she complained to the judges, "I know my civil rights. An employer can't discriminate against women in dishing out jobs, If he hires men with pre-school aged children, he's got to hire women with pre-school aged children as well, otherwise it's discrimination in violation of the Civil Rights Act."

"Not so!," insisted Max.

"I like women ... they're the last people I would discriminate against. In fact, they're a very high percentage of my employees. When it comes to mothers, however, it's a different ballgame. The Civil Rights Act talks about men and women ... not anything about mothers."

IF YOU WERE THE JUDGE ...

Would you find that Max was guilty of discrimination in refusing to hire Battling Betsy?

THE JUDGE RULED ...

YES! The judge ruled that unless it is a bona fide occupational disqualification reasonably necessary to the normal operation of a particular business or enterprise, it is a violation of the Civil Rights Act to refuse to employ an individual because of that individual's religion, sex or national origin.

Based on a 1971 United States Supreme Court decision.

React to this story:

0
0
0
0
0

Recommended for you