Rocco made a name for himself, but, the name wasn't his.

The result?

Rocco was charged with forgery and was sentenced to serve a bundle of years in a federal penitentiary. His sentence, however ... according to the specific terms in the judge's order ... was to be served after he had served a full 10-year sentence for car theft.

With the luck of a poker player who had just drawn a jack to fill an inside straight, Rocco ... who had only served a small portion of his 10-year jail sentence for car theft ... was suddenly granted a parole. Consequently, he figured he had many years of freedom left before he had to commence serving time for his federal forgery conviction.

Before he could begin to "Whoop it up" in celebration, however, the feds hauled him off to a federal prison to start serving his forgery sentence.

Without ado, Rocco demanded his immediate release in court.

"Not even a Doubting Thomas could doubt it," he told the judge. "My federal sentence for forgery was perfectly specific. My sentence for forgery was not to begin until after I had served my full 10-year sentence for car theft -- and that's still a lot of years down the road."

IF YOU WERE THE JUDGE ...

Would you order Rocco released from federal custody until his 10-year sentence for car theft had expired?

THIS IS HOW THE JUDGE RULED ...

NO!

The judge held that the only reason Rocco was ordered to serve his federal prison sentence immediately after he served his state sentence was because the state sentence was an obstacle to his having to serve his federal sentence.

Upon receiving his pardon, concluded the judge, that obstacle was removed and Rocco was "free" to be locked up to start serving his federal sentence.

Based upon a 1948 United State Supreme Court decision.

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