Quilting is a time-honored tradition. Many of us treasure our old quilts, passed down through generations of ancestors. Whether it is a beautiful display quilt, made from a traditional quilt block pattern, or a plain utilitarian piece, worn from years of use, quilts represent our family history.

You will be glad to know that quilting is alive and well in Madison County. The techniques, fabrics and equipment used may have changed, but the finished products are still beautiful and represent labors of love. The Madison County Extension Homemaker Club, The Happy Hands Quilters, is one group that carries on the traditions of quilting. It meets every Thursday at 10 a.m. at the Extension Center to share quilting ideas and tips, help each other with projects and enjoy each other’s company. It is much like an old-fashioned quilting bee (without the quilting frame). They also share the results of their labor with others.

Last year, one of the members was visiting a relative at the Markey Cancer Center. While visiting, she noticed that out of all the beautiful quilts displayed at the center, there were none from Madison County. The Happy Hands Quilters immediately took on the project and just a few weeks ago, presented a beautiful wall hanging to Dr. Randall Rowland, President and CEO of the Markey Cancer Foundation, for display at the center.

Another version of quilting that Madison County residents enjoy every day is the barn quilts that started appearing about three years ago. The quilt trail has grown to 54 quilts that cover the county. The trail combines the art of quilting and preservation of old tobacco barns that dot the countryside into a unique and eye-catching public art form. At the last quilt hanging on Oct. 19, the Cornflower Quilt Block was hung at the new Jackson County Welcome Center on Big Hill Road. The Cornflower is displayed on the Jackson County side and the Jackson Star, made by the Jackson County Quilt Trail Committee, hangs on the Madison County side.

If you have not been on the quilt trail in a while, stop by the Extension Education Center, 230 Duncannon Lane, Richmond or visit our Web site at http://ces.ca.uky.edu/madison/ for a quilt trail map.

For more information on the Happy Hands Quilters club or the quilt trail, call 623-4072.

Educational programs of the University of Kentucky Cooperative Extension Service serve all people regardless of race, color, age, sex, religion, disability or national origin.



Cutline for the people pic: Happy Hands Quilters presented this wall hanging to the Markey Cancer Foundation. From left are Trish Jaracz, Betty Scheiderman, Dr. Randall Rowland and Beverly Rockwell.

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