The Richmond Register

Recipes

March 13, 2014

Shop your refrigerator, part two: Casseroles

RICHMOND — EKU Dietetic Intern and Madison County Cooperative Extension FCS Intern

Sarah/Bill edited



Last article, we wrote about making soup out of leftover ingredients you have around the house. With this winter giving us one more round of snow early in the month, a hot bowl of soup turned out to be a good way to stay warm while staying home.

This time, we visit the same topic, but with another hearty dish: the casserole. The benefits to knowing what is in your cabinets and fridge remain the same – the positive effect it has on being clean and organized, saving money by limiting the chance of buying something you already have, and using food instead of throwing it away due to expiration.

However, with winter still lingering and the possible threat of severe spring weather only a few weeks away, perhaps the biggest, and not yet mentioned, advantage of knowing what you have in your cabinets is safety.

Storms of all kinds often lead us to staying in the house, and thus not being able to run out and grab some lunch or dinner. By going through your refrigerator and pantry and knowing you have options to put together a quick soup or casserole, there is one less stresser on you and your family during what can already be a scary time. Storm or sunshine, it is always a good idea to shop your refrigerator first.

Casserole dishes are similar to soups in that they can combine several types of foods into one dish, saving you some time and money. By taking foods you have left over, such as meat, vegetables and noodles, you have the opportunity to be creative again and make one dish with several different items.

This is a great benefit of casseroles, because not only do you get to experiment with different flavors, but you are adding many different kinds of nutrients into one meal. Using whole grain noodles, for example, increases the amount of fiber and adds to your total whole grain intake for the day.

They are a perfect opportunity to add a variety of vegetables, giving more color and thus, more vitamins and minerals. Just as with soups, if you have leftover meat available, or pinto or black beans, add those in to provide protein and flavor.

The casserole is typically thought of as comfort food, so it is something that should be kept in mind to make when the cold temperatures won’t go away or stormy weather keeps us all inside. The rules for shopping remain the same; use leftovers, canned or frozen vegetables, fresh vegetables and ingredients about to go bad, and other foods you need an excuse to use.

The actual ingredients remain up to you; so have fun, save some money, and wow friends and family with a new dish to call your own.

When beginning to select ingredients, keep three letters in mind: S, P and V. S stands for starch, meaning select one type of pasta, rice or noodle for your dish. P is your choice of protein. This can be lean ground beef, seafood, chopped boiled egg, diced chicken or turkey, or your favorite type of bean.

Finally, V means vegetable. Select any of your choice, and combine with the starch and protein. If you wish to use a sauce, choose low-sodium cream of chicken or mushroom, one can of diced tomatoes, or one bottle of prepared sauce you may have in your pantry. Use seasonings of your choice throughout the dish, or add onion, celery or green pepper if you have them left over.

When finishing your casserole, select a topping of your choice, such as a cup of shredded cheese, bread crumbs,or your favorite nut. Place all ingredients except your topping in a dish and bake at 350 degrees for 50 minutes to one hour covered; remove and add topping, then cook for an additional 10 minutes uncovered.

(SPV method adapted from UK Extension Mix It Up 1-2-3: Time Saving Kitchen Tips for People on the Go)

Those are a few tips to get your casserole started; remember, include whatever ingredients you choose, have fun and most of all, enjoy.

Educational programs of the Cooperative Extension Service serve all people regardless of race, color, sex, religion, disability or national origin.

 

1
Text Only
Recipes
  • GinaNoemugpic.jpg Growing and cooking with herbs

    We all want to eat food that tastes good. One of the most common ways we tend to make food taste good is by adding salt. Unfortunately, most American diets are too high in sodium. Diets high in sodium can raise blood pressure, which can lead to many major health issues including heart disease. Herbs provide a great way for us to limit our sodium intake while still consuming flavorful foods.

    May 16, 2014 1 Photo

  • 04.18 Food .jpg It’s egg party time

    I love this time of the year because eggs really do go down in price during the Easter season. I have some new recipes on how to fix eggs besides the coloring part.

    April 18, 2014 2 Photos

  • 03.21 Jacksons.jpg Let’s go to Jackson, and I don’t mean Mississippi


    The Jackson I have been to this week is right here in Richmond. If you get to 203 S. Third St. in Richmond, that is where you will find “Jackson’s,” owned and operated by Sean Jackson.

    March 21, 2014 2 Photos

  • Shop your refrigerator, part two: Casseroles

    Last article, we wrote about making soup out of leftover ingredients you have around the house. With this winter giving us one more round of snow early in the month, a hot bowl of soup turned out to be a good way to stay warm while staying home.

    March 13, 2014

  • Let’s have a Mardi Gras party in Kentucky

    It’s the time of year when the people in New Orleans celebrate a festival called Mardi Gras. Many states now do the same. Some call it “Fat Tuesday” which I have never understood till I went to New Orleans (five times) and saw all of the excitement for myself.

    February 27, 2014

  • Beat the winter blues with meatballs

    When it’s this cold outside it’s nice to warm up with some good comfort food.
    I can think of few things more wonderful than the smell of simmering meatballs coming from the kitchen while I cuddle with my two young children, and a few good books, on a brisk winter day.

    February 27, 2014

  • 01.31 Red Velvet Cookie.jpg Bake up some red velvet, white chocolate cookies

    After the kids come in from building snow forts and making snow angels, I like to have big cup of hot chocolate with extra marshmallows. But if you really want to indulge after playing in the snow, try these melt-in-your-mouth cookies.

    January 31, 2014 1 Photo

  • Liz Denny.jpg Home cooking bonds the Culton sisters

    Fours sisters from the Culton family share a bond of good home cooking.
    The sisters are: JoEtta Culton Dunn, Joyce Culton Smith, Betty Culton Oliver and Kathy Culton Smith.

    January 23, 2014 3 Photos

  • 01.17 cooking pie pic .jpg Rogers loves cooking

    Barbara Rogers started cooking as a teenager in high school. She was inspired to cook by her high school home economics teacher Dixie Edwards.

    January 16, 2014 2 Photos

  • GinaNoemugpic.jpg Keeping food safe during emergencies

    Today’s article is one I have submitted before, but the information in it is worth reading again.
    The food in refrigerators and freezers represents a significant investment. Winter storms can cause power outages that may last from a few hours to several days before electricity can be restored.

    January 10, 2014 1 Photo