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September 23, 2013

Powwow to feature education on Native American culture, memorial services

RICHMOND — The Richmond Powwow, happening this weekend at Battlefield Park on US 421 north of Kingston, will feature special guests, educational opportunities, memorial services and more.

According to Jan Quigg, Powwow Coordinator, the event will begin Friday with school day bchildren from Madison and other counties visiting a teepee village set up by American Indians representing a variety of various tribes.

“Each child will get the opportunity to enter a teepee and hear a story or learn a craft from an elder,” Quigg said. Visitors also will get to see and participate in drumming and dances.

Activities will continue into the evening with the gates opening to the public at 5 p.m. and a grand entry at 6 p.m.

About 20 vendors will be on hand selling crafts and food, including fried corn, which Quigg said was something new to the powwow.

Saturday and Sunday the gates to the park will open at 10 a.m., with grand entries at noon. Native Americans in full ceremonial dress will drum and dance, and they will be memorializing veterans, Quigg said.

At 3 p.m. Saturday, a native-style memorial service will be conducted for Scotty Saltsman, a member of the powwow association who passed away in June.

This year’s powwow will feature two special guests.

Arvel Bird, a grammy-winning musician who plays celtic, folk, Native American and blues/rock music will be performing. Larry Sellers, the actor who played Cloud Dancing in the television show Dr. Quinn, Medicine Woman, also also make an appearance to dance at the powwow, sharing stories of his time on the show and his career as a stunt man.

Quigg said the powwow is inter-tribal, meaning people of all races are welcome to come and share their culture at the event.

The powwow has been taking place in Richmond since 1994, and Quigg said she and the rest of the powwow association are proud of that.

“We’ve been a part of this community for 20 years, so we must be doing something right,” she said. “The culture needs to stay alive. Native Americans are still here.”

Admission is $5 adults, $2 children with no family having to pay more than $15.

Seth Littrell can be reached at slittrell@richmondregister.com or 624-6623.

 

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