The Richmond Register

March 13, 2013

I-75 Connector public information meeting scheduled for April 16

Visit www.i-75connector.com for more information.


Register staff report

RICHMOND — Madison County residents will have an opportunity next month to give input on the proposed Interstate 75 Connector that would create a route between US 27 in Jessamine County and I-75 Exit 95 in Madison County.

A public information meeting “open-house setting” is scheduled April 16 at White Hall Elementary, from 5 to 8 p.m., according to Nancy Wiser with the I-75 Connector project.

Citizens can learn more about the eight proposed zones identified as possible routes for the connector by the Kentucky Transportation Cabinet, she said.

The project team will consider public comment, along with input from the the Citizens’ Advisory Committee, a group of community leaders and residents from Madison, Jessamine and Fayette counties.

The CAC met Tuesday evening in Richmond for the first time since July. The group is scheduled to reconvene March 26 in Jessamine County to further discuss the proposed zones.

Some of the proposed zones overlap with shared segments in some areas. They also vary in width from 500 to 2000 feet, according to information provided at the meeting.

Screening criteria used to compare and assess zones are based on:

• Highway connectivity and safety factors

• Environmental features including natural areas, water resources and farmland

• Agency recommendations for regulatory requirements and best practices

• Public input and concerns related to direct impacts, historical features and ecology

• Engineering and constructability considerations

• Cultural resources including historic sites, cemeteries and archaeology

• Community impacts such as homes, churches and sensitive populations.  

Several sites within the corridor have been identified as eligible for listing on the National Register of Historic Places, including 16 in Madison, 11 in Jessamine and one in Fayette.

The I-75 Connector project team will narrow the eight zones to four, which will be carried into the next phase of the study, Wiser said.

The next phase will provide a greater level of review and more detailed environmental assessment, a process that will result in a recommended alternative and a preliminary financing plan if the project moves forward, Wiser said.

“The decisions on how — or if — the project will proceed is still more than a year away,” said Bob Nunley, a KYTC project development branch manager. “In the meantime, we will continue the environment preliminary design process, communicating with the public as we go.”

Visit www.i-75connector.com for more details.