The Richmond Register

November 3, 2013

Accused bombmaker intends to plead insanity

Daughter tells judge he is not a threat

By Sarah Hogsed
Register News Writer

RICHMOND — The attorney for a Berea man accused of making bombs in his home has filed notice with U.S. District Court that his client will plead insanity as his defense.

Warren Douglas Adams, 46, was arrested Oct. 15 after two people told an Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives agent that Adams was making bombs and had threatened to rob a bank, according to court documents.

The information included a photo of Adams wearing a vest with suspected IEDs attached to it and several text messages sent from Adams to another party.

Adams was arrested at his home in the 100 block of Courtland Avenue, and federal agents reported finding 11 suspected explosive devices inside along with empty plastic containers of Pyrodex propellant powder, 30 to 40 feet of rolled hobby fuse and an empty box of CO2 canisters.

Adams is charged with possession of an unregistered destructive device by a person who has previously been convicted of a felony, according to federal court documents.

Adams pleaded guilty in 2012 to third-degree burglary in Madison Circuit Court, and he received a three-year probated sentence, according to court documents.

Adams appeared Oct. 22 in U.S. District Court, and his appointed attorney requested a mental-health hearing. After listening to information in support of a hearing, Judge Robert E. Weir granted the motion after finding there was “reasonable cause” to believe Adams was suffering from a mental disease that would make him unable to understand the court proceedings or assist in his defense.

Adams will remain in federal custody during his mental-health evaluation, the court documents stated.

Adams’ daughter, Loren Trute, wrote the court about her father, and the handwritten letter was included in his case file. She told the judge that private conversations between her and her father, via text message, were “misunderstood” by other relatives, who then reported them to the ATF.

Trute detailed in the letter a lifetime of problems her father has endured and stated he “craves attention,” often exaggerating and telling “wild stories” to impress people.

“I do not believe he is dangerous,” Trute wrote.

“Playing with noisemakers and fireworks and experimenting with this is something his father did with him as a boy,” Trute also wrote. “My father did not see it as illegal or wrong or dangerous in the hands of someone who knew what they were doing and had no intentions of doing harm.”

Trute said much of the case against her father is a misunderstanding with things taken out of context, and “it has been more destructive to our family to go through this then it is actually worth, considering that (Adams) isn’t really a threat to anyone.”

Sarah Hogsed can be reached at shogsed@richmondregister.com or 624-6694.