The Richmond Register

March 30, 2013

Two men indicted in connection with Army depot ammo theft

By Sarah Hogsed
Register News Writer

RICHMOND — A Madison grand jury has indicted two men in connection with the theft of more than $500 in ammunition from the Blue Grass Army Depot.

Jeffery Chesbro and Justin Hisle were indicted on charges of receiving stolen property (more than $500) and tampering with physical evidence.

The two charges are Class D felonies, which carry possible sentences of one to five years in prison.

The indictment states that from July 10, 2011, to Aug. 15, 2011, the two men possessed ammunition that had been stolen from the U.S. Army at the Blue Grass Army Depot.

They also concealed the property “with the intent to impair its recovery and use in an official proceeding,” the indictment alleges.

Other indictments issued Wednesday

• Dana Feltner, two counts of possession of matter portraying sexual performance by a minor. He faces a maximum sentence of 10 years in prison.

• Timothy Lee Horn, second-degree burglary and second-degree persistent felony offender. If convicted as a PFO, Horn could face a sentence of 10 to 20 years in prison on the burglary charge.

• Kelly Ann Brown, promoting contraband. The Class D felony is punishable by one to five years in prison.

• Hannah B. Pingleton, first-degree promoting contraband, first-degree possession of a controlled substance (heroin), second-degree possession of a controlled substance (amphetamine), possession of drug paraphernalia, third-degree criminal trespass and second-degree persistent felony offender. Pingleton faces up to 20 years in prison on the charges.

• Johnothan Harris, first-degree trafficking (narcotic pills), first-degree possession of a controlled substance (cocaine), possession of drug paraphernalia, driving under the influence of drugs, third-degree trafficking in a controlled substance and second-degree persistent felony offender.

• Nicholas Masden, second-degree robbery. The charge carries a sentence of 10 to 20 years in prison.

• Mitchell Peters, first-degree bail-jumping. The Class D felony is punishable by one to five years in prison.

• Deandre S. Ayers, first-degree bail-jumping. The Class D felony is punishable by one to five years in prison.

An indictment is a formal statement of charges and does not imply guilt, only that grand jurors believe the state has enough evidence to prosecute.

Sarah Hogsed can be reached at shogsed@richmondregister.com or 624-6694.