The Richmond Register

November 28, 2012

Christmas tree facts: 350 million Christmas trees are growing in the U.S

By Amanda Sears
Extension Agent

RICHMOND — Christmas tree facts

• 98 percent of all Christmas trees are grown on farms, while only 2 percent are cut from the wild.

• To ensure enough trees for harvest, growers plant one to three seedlings for every tree harvested.

• In 2012, 46 million Christmas tree seedlings were planted by U.S. growers.

    • It takes six to 10 years of fighting heavy rain, wind, hail and drought to get a mature tree.

• 9.5 million artificial trees were purchased in the United States in 2011.

• 30.8 million live Christmas trees were purchased in the United States in 2011, with a real market value of $1.07 billion.

• The most popular Christmas trees are: Scotch pine, Douglas fir, Noble fir, Fraser fir, balsam fir and white pine.

• Christmas trees are baled to protect the branches from damage during shipping.

• There are approximately 350 million Christmas trees growing on U.S. farms.

• Approximately 100,000 people are employed full or part-time in the Christmas tree industry.

• Oregon, North Carolina, Michigan, Pennsylvania, Wisconsin, Washington, New York and Virginia were the top Christmas tree producing states in 2009.

• 170,000 acres of land in the United States were in Christmas tree production in 2009. Christmas trees are grown and harvested in all 50 states.

• Recycled real Christmas trees have been used to make sand and soil erosion barriers and been placed in ponds for fish shelter.

• Growing Christmas trees provides a habitat for wildlife.

• Christmas trees can remove dust and pollen from the air.

• Artificial trees will last for six years in your home, but for centuries in a landfill.

• An acre of Christmas trees provides the daily oxygen requirements of 18 people.

• You should not burn your Christmas tree in the fireplace; it can contribute to creosote buildup.

• Live Christmas trees are involved in less than one-tenth of one percent of residential fires, and mostly when ignited by some external ignition sources. The major factors involved in Christmas tree fires are electrical problems, decorative lights, candles, and a heat source too close to the tree.

 

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