The Richmond Register

November 14, 2012

Hospice benefit: The Shadow Box


Register staff report

RICHMOND — The Shadow Box, will be staged Friday and Saturday at 8 p.m. in the Black Box Theatre of the EKU Center for the Arts. Tickets are $20 for general admission and $10 for students with IDs. Tickets can be purchased at www.hospicecp.org or by calling 986-1500. Purchasing tickets in advance is encouraged. All proceeds will benefit Hospice Care Plus programs.

The Shadow Box is the first theater production to benefit Hospice, said first-time director Angela Bailey-Davis, who also is special events coordinator for Hospice.

“The plot and themes are closely connected to our work at Hospice,” she said. “It seemed like a perfect fit. You will laugh and you will cry. This play is known for its seamless transitions from seriousness to humor and back again.”

The performances will feature a strong cast of Lexington and Madison County theater veterans, as well as a few newcomers, she said.

The Shadow Box premiered on Broadway in 1977 and is a winner of both a Tony Award and the Pulitzer Prize for Drama. A television adaptions, directed by Paul Newman, earned a Golden Globe and three Emmy nominations.

The play takes place over 24 hours in three separate cabins on a hospital’s property. Joe, Brian and Felicity are patients living in the respective cabins with their families, just after exhausting treatment options for their conditions.

Differences in how each family unit handles the situation become apparent quickly.

A wife refuses to accept her husband's diagnosis, a son is kept in the dark, one patient is brutally frank about his condition and a mother-daughter duo struggle with family secrets and an inability to talk about what's coming.

“By the end of the play, I think the audience is left uncertain about the relative right or wrong of anyone's coping mechanism,” Bailey-Davis said. “Instead, I think one leaves with an understanding that it is this moment that counts the most. What you do with this moment in the face of the inevitable is the true measure of a person. And that's why this play is relevant to everyone, regardless of whether you’ve ever lost a loved one.”