The Richmond Register

Lifestyles & Community

October 1, 2013

What a way to serve bread ... with a spoon

RICHMOND — The spoonbread festival has come and gone in Berea, but what a successful festival it was. The main attractions was, of course, the spoonbread.

How did this come in to our area anyhow?

Richard Hougen who was the hotel manager at Boone Tavern in Berea collected some of the best spoonbread recipes.

Spoonbread is the richest and lightest of all corn breads. This bread can be traced back to the 1800s when American Indian culture called it suppone or suppawn. Thus, the Indians are considered to be the true ancestral source of spoonbread.

In memory of Mr. Hougen, I have listed his recipe first with other varieties to follow. I do hope you try at least one of these.

Boone Tavern spoonbread

INGREDIENTS:

4 tbsp softened butter

3 cups milk

1 1/4 cups finely ground white cornmeal

1 tsp baking powder

1 tsp fine salt

2 eggs, well beaten

DIRECTIONS:

Grease a 9-inch round cake pan with some of the soften butter. Cut out a parchment paper circle to fit inside the pan. Grease the paper with the remaining butter. Set the pan aside.

In a 2-quart saucepan, bring the milk to a boil, whisking occasionally, over high heat. While whisking, pour in the cornmeal in a steady stream. Whisk vigorously to incorporate the cornmeal, for about 1 minute. Remove from heat and set aside to let the cornmeal mixture cool to room temperature.

Heat oven to 350 degrees. Place the cornmeal mixture into a mixing bowl. Add the remaining ingredients and mix on medium speed unto mixed well, about 15 minutes.

Pour cornmeal batter into the greased cake pan and bake until golden brown and puffy. This takes about 1 hour and 20 minutes. Serve immediately

Note: When I made this, the secret is in the beating time. This I think helps the fluffy part of the bread

Boone Tavern was one of the first places my daughter worked for her student labor job. At that time, back in the 1980s, the students were not allowed to ask for tips. Well, being the actress that she turned out to be, she really pulled the wool over some of those poor customers’ eyes who came to the tavern during that period. She would make up some of the most “poor ol’ me” stories you can imagine. She even wore at one meal a pair of shoes with a hole in the sole. A guy one night tipped her $50.

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