The Richmond Register

Lifestyles & Community

October 28, 2012

Jane Beshear to help celebrate opening of God’s Outreach Madison County Food Bank

RICHMOND — The face of hunger may surprise you. Some are older, others younger. Often, they are children. All are Madison County people with the most basic of needs — food for themselves and their families.

God’s Outreach Madison County Food Bank has grown from humble beginnings 13 years ago to its new facility at 1512 E. Main St. This building was built with a $315,000 federal block grant and matching fund assistance from the county and city governments of $15,000 each.

This truly has been a community effort with countless volunteers, having donated goods, services, excavating, electric and building man hours and supplies, all being top of the line, quality workmanship. God’s Outreach also receives donated accounting, legal services, printing design, and some office supplies.

October is Hunger Awareness month. God’s Outreach Food Bank is one of the the largest single distributing food bank in the state, serving 1,400 families monthly. It also helps send 1,350 school kids home each weekend with backpacks filled with food. This provides children from 14 school with food for two meals and snacks. No one is turned away when first presenting.

All that is required of recipients of food from God’s Outreach is a valid I.D. or paper with name and address stating they are a Madison County resident in need of food. This is an emergency food bank and asks that you come only when you have true need and only one visit per household every 30 days. There is limited flexibility for emergencies. The hours of operation are 9 a.m. to noon Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday.

This growing operation is staffed primarily with volunteer. They collect and sort food, pack the bags, log people in and perform many other tasks. God’s Outreach Food Bank operates with only one full and one part-time employee.

“We have done an impossible task, with God’s help,” says Anthony Lowery, director. Anthony and wife Linda both came from humble beginnings and have dedicated their lives to feeding the hungry families around them. With its new facility, God’s Outreach Food Bank is out of the building phase and on to the growth and service phase. 

On Thursday, Nov. 15, at 2 p.m. First Lady Jane Beshear, along with Richmond Mayor Jim Barnes and County Judge/Executive Kent Clark, will attend a ribbon cutting for God’s Outreach Food Bank assisted by the Richmond Chamber of Commerce.

This day has been long awaited and will be an event we can all rejoice in and support with our attendance.

Funding for the food bank is ongoing. No local, state, or federal funds are part of its operational budget. They are totally dependent on food and monetary donations to pay for their mortgage and costs of the food they purchase for ongoing programs.

This Christmas there are a couple of ways for the community to help those less fortunate. “Give the Gift of Food” is a Christmas card that would, for your donation of $25 or more, be given with the December distribution of food to the families and bear your family’s name as giver.

Donations should be sent to PO Box 1226 , Richmond, KY 40476-1226. The phone number is 859-623-2220. The website is www.GodsOutreach.com. Some churches are sponsoring a gift box for donations with a “birthday party for Jesus” theme.

God’s Outreach Food Pantry has a need list that includes grant writer, printer ink, printer paper, dishes for kitchen, printing, design, new crockpots for cooking lessons, a phone system, steam table, locked file cabinet, cabinet for supplies.

Other ways to get involved include calling, mailing or going online to make a tax-deductible donation. You also may invite a representative to come to your church or organization to share the God’s Outreach vision, arrange a fund-raiser, volunteer in one or more of their programs or organize a food drive.    

God’s Outreach Food Bank serves all of Madison County. Please step up with food, money, or volunteer your time. There are hungry families here. Missionaries come in all shapes and sizes.

Won’t you help and then come celebrate the ribbon cutting Nov. 15 at 2 p.m.

1
Text Only
Lifestyles & Community
  • 07.09 Lisa Adams.jpg The Clover Games were a success

    Almost 300 youth and volunteers from Madison County attended the 2014 Madison County 4-H Camp last week, June 30 through July 3. The campers who attended had a great time.
    On Monday night, there was a carnival, complete with inflatables, cotton candy and snow cones.

    July 8, 2014 1 Photo

  • EKU, Berea to co-host apiculture society

    From July 28 through Aug. 1, the Eastern Apiculture Society will be buzzing around Madison County as Berea College and EKU co-host this international event (www.easternapiculture.com).
    This year’s theme, “Esprit de Bee,” pays tribute to the Kentucky National Guard’s Agriculture Development Teams, specifically their leadership in apiculture.

    July 8, 2014

  • Brandon-Sears-c.jpg Trace minerals for beef cattle

    Grazing livestock require many different nutrients to support growth, milk production and body-tissue maintenance.
    Often, minerals are separated into two categories. The minerals that are required in relatively large amounts are called major or macro minerals. These usually are listed on feed tags with a percentage sign after the name.
    Those needed in lesser amounts are called micro, minor or trace minerals  and are generally listed in parts per million (ppm).

    July 8, 2014 1 Photo

  • Amanda-Sears-c.jpg A lot is going on with Extension this month

    The Meet Your Farmers Tour was a huge success.
    Despite the rainy weather, we had over 120 people visit farms and farmers markets around the county. I just want to thank the farms that opened their gates, as well as the producers at our farmers markets: Baldwin Farms, Turpin Cattle Farm, Berea Garden and Greenhouse, Hunt Acres, Meadowbrook Farm at EKU, Madison County Farmers Market, Berea Farmers Market and Downtown Richmond Farmers Market.

    July 8, 2014 1 Photo

  • Fresh-grown herbs making their way to the shelves

    The July 4 holiday is fast approaching, and the Berea College Farm Store will have a limited schedule this week:
    It will be open for regular hours Wednesday and Thursday, 2 to 6:30 p.m., but closed Friday through Monday.
    We will re-open Tuesday on our normal schedule. To celebrate Independence Day and to make up for our shortened schedule, we will extend our 10-percent off sale for all Berea College raised beef and pork products (excluding ground beef) through the end of this week.

    July 1, 2014

  • 07.02 barklice 070214.jpg Barklice not a threat to trees

    Have you noticed a mass of small gray insects on your trees, all moving together as a group? Then you may have barklice!
    This has been the summer of barklice in Kentucky. I have received an unprecedented amount of phone calls about this insect. At the UK insect lab in Lexington, specimens, descriptio

    July 1, 2014 1 Photo

  • Brandon-Sears-c.jpg Clean water is essential for livestock health

    Water is the most important nutrient for animals, and it is essential to ensure that animals have ample access to clean water.
    Having water available for livestock allows for optimal animal performance and health. Dry matter intake is directly related to water intake, and the less an animal drinks, the less feed it will consume.

    July 1, 2014 3 Photos

  • Dr-Jack-Rutherford.jpg High-fat diets not risky for endurance athletes

    Athletes are always looking for a competitive edge in their diet but have to contend with potential negative health consequences, including increased fat storage and increased risk of coronary artery disease.
    Higher fat and carbohydrate diets in particular are front and center in the athletic marketplace, but one wonders whether these diets pose additional risk to endurance athletes.

    June 28, 2014 1 Photo

  • Medical homes matter for kids

    “The lion ate him!” the two-year-old boy exclaimed to his father.
    The father smiled and said, “Yes, that’s what happened in the story we read last night.”
    Young children often say things that are out of context which leaves most adults befuddled as to what a child is talking about. The only adults that will understand are those who have spent time with the child and can fill in the context.

    June 28, 2014

  • 6-28 PetsofWeek1.jpg Pets of the Week
    This week’s cat is China, a 5-year-old spayed female.  This week’s dog is Shilo, a 2-year-old female Labrador mix. 
     
     

    June 28, 2014 2 Photos

AP Video
Argentina to Face Germany in World Cup Final Service Held for 200 Whose Bodies Went Unclaimed Kim Kardashian Hits Up Valentino Show in Paris "Hotwives" Spoofs Reality TV Israeli Offensive Escalates in Gaza Attack Dozens Gain Citizenship As Debate Continues Dodgers Found Partly Responsible in Fan Beating Children of Deported Parents Speak Out GOP: Immigration a 'human Rights Issue' Raw: 10-year Sentence for Ex-New Orleans Mayor Raw: Fans Gather for Argentina-Netherlands Match Froome Crashes Out on Bumpy 5th Tour Stage Obama Talks Economy, Slams Republicans Police: Prostitute Accused in Overdose Death Tornadoes Kill Four in Central New York McCaskill: Campus Assault Survey Is Wake Up Call Raw: Obama Shoots Pool in Denver Typhoon Nears Japan's Main Islands Day After: Brazil Reeling in WC Loss Weaver Reprises Ripley Role for 'Alien' Game
Hyperlocal Search
Premier Guide
Find a business

Walking Fingers
Maps, Menus, Store hours, Coupons, and more...
Premier Guide
Poll

How far will you be traveling for your summer vacation?

Staying in Kentucky
Visiting a neighboring state
Driving or flying a greater distance
     View Results