The Richmond Register

Lifestyles & Community

August 20, 2013

Wet summer complicates mosquitoe control

MADISON COUNTY — With the moist summer we’ve had in Kentucky, mosquitoes have had a prime environment to flourish and become a prevalent pest. It’s important to know where mosquitoes breed and what you can do to reduce their numbers in and around your home and to protect yourself from bites.

Unfortunately, there is no easy solution for managing mosquitoes. Countless products on the market claim to be effective and easy to use, but few have appreciable value in lessening the annoyance and incidence of bites. There are limits to what we can do to minimize their abundance, but employing a few easy techniques can give you a little relief.

The most effective way to reduce the number of mosquitoes around your home is to find and eliminate their breeding sites – standing water. Adults of some mosquito species remain near their breeding site. Others can travel long distances, even up to several miles. Because of this, problem mosquitoes may come from breeding sites some distance away.

Regardless of recent weather patterns – wet, dry, warm or cool – there are plenty of potential places in which mosquitoes can develop. A neglected bird bath, swimming pool or clogged rain gutter can produce hundreds of new mosquitoes in a just a few days. Trees uprooted by storms leave soil depressions that collect seepage and rainwater. Large areas of standing water, such as from swamps, sluggishly moving streams or ditches may require efforts beyond those of individual property owners.

However, there are effective steps you can take to minimize mosquito breeding on your property:

 1.    Dispose of old tires, buckets, aluminum cans, plastic sheeting or other refuse that can hold water. Empty accumulated water from trash cans, boats, wheel barrows, pet dishes and flower pot bottoms. If possible, turn these items over when they are not in use.

 2.    Clean debris from rain gutters and unclog obstructed downspouts. Clogged rain gutters are one of the most overlooked breeding sites for mosquitoes around homes. Remove any standing water on flat roofs or around structures. Repair leaking faucets and air conditioners that produce puddles for several days.

 3.    Change water in bird baths and wading pools at least once a week and keep swimming pools cleaned and chlorinated. Ornamental pools can be aerated or stocked with mosquito-eating fish. Aeration/water movement helps because mosquitoes prefer quiet, non-flowing water for egg laying and development.

 4.    Fill or drain ditches and swampy areas and other soil depressions. Remove, drain or fill tree holes and stumps with mortar or sealant to prevent accumulation of water. Eliminate standing water and seepage around animal watering troughs, cisterns and septic tanks. Be sure that cistern screens are intact and that access covers fit tightly.

 

Educational programs of the Cooperative Extension Service serve all people regardless of race, color, sex, religion, disability or national origin.

 

1
Text Only
Lifestyles & Community
AP Video
Kerry: Humanitarian Cease-fire Efforts Continue Raw: Corruption Trial Begins for Former Va Gov. The Carbon Trap: US Exports Global Warming UN Security Council Calls for Gaza Cease-fire Traditional African Dishes Teach Healthy Eating 13 Struck by Lightning on Calif. Beach Baseball Hall of Famers Inducted Israel, Hamas Trade Fire Despite Truce in Gaza Italy's Nibali Set to Win First Tour De France Raw: Shipwrecked Concordia Completes Last Voyage Raw: Sea Turtle Hatchlings Emerge From Nest Raw: Massive Dust Storm Covers Phoenix 12-hour Cease-fire in Gaza Fighting Begins Raw: Bolivian Dancers Attempt to Break Record Raw: Israel, Palestine Supporters Rally in US Raw: Air Algerie Flight 5017 Wreckage Virginia Governor Tours Tornado Aftermath Judge Faces Heat Over Offer to Help Migrant Kids Kangaroo Goes Missing in Oklahoma More M17 Bodies Return, Sanctions on Russia Grow
Hyperlocal Search
Premier Guide
Find a business

Walking Fingers
Maps, Menus, Store hours, Coupons, and more...
Premier Guide
Poll

Should Madison County’s three local governing bodies ban smoking in indoor public places?

Yes
No
     View Results