The Richmond Register

Lifestyles & Community

March 5, 2013

It’s almost peach time in the markets

Table Talk

RICHMOND — I just love when I start to see the selections of fresh peaches to arrive in our local food stores. I wanted to share with you some recipes on how to use some of these fruits a different way.

The peach is a member of the rose family. A cousin to apricots, cherries, plums and almonds. Out of the hundreds of varieties of peaches, each can be classified as clingstone, freestone or semi freestone. In general, most peaches are classified as to how firmly the flesh attaches to the pit.

My favorite peach is the freestone. As it implies, the stone is easily removed from this variety making it a good choice for eating fresh. They tend to be larger than a clingstone. Harvest begins in May and continues to October.

Scott County Schools Food Service director Eleanor Hall asked me to research and find a recipe that her family had used for a peach pie using the peelings off the peaches.

I found the recipe and made the pie. It is such a surprise ... Hope you try this one.

Peach pie with peelings

Ingredients:

8 to 10 peaches depending on the size of the peaches

1/2 cup of water

2 tbsp of lemon juice

Dash of salt

2 tbsp of vinegar

2 cups of sugar

Directions:

Peel peaches and wash peelings. Put in a larger cooking pot, add water. Cook on medium heat, stirring occasionally. Cook peelings until they are tender. Add a dash of salt, sugar, lemon juice and vinegar. Cook peelings until they are thick enough for one pie.

You can freeze or seal this in pint jars if needed. I can really see this being used if you are making peach preserves or jam and have all these peelings left over.

I made this pie this week and added some of the peaches as well because we did not eat all the ones I peeled. I used a commercial pie shell and baked it for about 45 minutes.

I wonder if one could do this with apple peelings?

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Lifestyles & Community