The Richmond Register

Lifestyles & Community

July 6, 2013

How do you know if you’re right for the job?

RICHMOND — There is a big difference in having a job you care about versus being employed to perform a specific task.

When you care about your job, you love to work. You find that you're eager to learn and want to provide quality products or services for the customers you serve.

Lastly, you care about your co-workers, as well as the employer.

If you're just employed to perform a task, you don't really care about the job. If you don't care, you don't want to learn anymore than what is required to keep your job and you certainly don't care about how your performance impacts your team of co-workers or the customers you serve. Frankly - you're only there to get a paycheck. Do you want to go into a life or death surgery with a doctor whose only concern is the paycheck?

It's important that you explore your options in the workforce and try out different types of jobs and careers until you find one you are passionate about. When you find a  passion, you find energy and the desire to pursue a path for the pure enjoyment and satisfaction of it.

When you love what you do and find a career you are passionate about, you go to work everyday, but don't feel like you are working. When you love what you do, you would perform the job even without a paycheck, because money is not what is driving you to keep the job.

Think about an average lifespan and work. The average lifespan is almost eighty years old and most people enter the workforce as they become an adult in their late teens or early twenties.  Has it occurred to you that you may spend fifty to sixty years in the workforce?

When you consider that you may spend approximately half a century in the workforce, what thoughts immediately jump into your mind? Dread and frustration or eagerness and pride? When you think about work and then dread your job, you're probably in the wrong line of work.

If you're in the wrong line of work, you're attitude toward your job is affected. When you're attitude toward the job is affected, your co-workers, clients and customers are able to detect your negative attitude toward the job and will typically view you as the chronically uncooperative and complaining co-worker. This means they dread having to work with you.

If you are in a supervisory position and have a negative attitude, you are making everyone's life miserable at work and productivity is affected. You may think people just don't want to work anymore, when in reality they don't want to work for you.

If you are frustrated and hate your job, it is time to re-evaluate why you are working in that position. Be honest with yourself. Determine if you're just chasing a paycheck and whether you have found a job that inspires you.

It's never too late to take action and enjoy the remainder of your working lifetime.

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