The Richmond Register

Lifestyles & Community

May 13, 2014

Cow disposition affects pregnancy rate

RICHMOND —

Now we have another good excuse to cull cows due to bad temperament.

Producers who routinely breed cows artificially realize that cows that are unruly and nervous are less likely to conceive to artificial insemination.

Presumably the lowered conception rates were because they have been stressed as they are passed through the working facilities and restrained while being synchronized and inseminated.

Now it seems that, even in the serenity of a natural breeding pasture, cows with bad dispositions are less likely to conceive when mated with bulls.

University of Florida animal scientists recorded disposition scores over two years on 160 Braford and 235 Brahman x British crossbred cows.

They wanted to evaluate the effects of cow temperament and energy status on the probability to become pregnant during a 90-day natural-breeding season.

Cows were scored as 1 equals calm, no movement, to 5 equals violent and continuous struggling while in the working chute.

Also a pen score assessment was assigned as 1 equals unalarmed and unexcited to, 5 equals very excited and aggressive toward technician.

An exit velocity speed score was measured as the cows exited the working chute as 1 equals slowest and 5 equals fastest.

An overall temperament index score was calculated by averaging the chute score, pen score and exit velocity score.

Blood samples were analyzed for cortisol concentrations. Cortisol is a hormone released when mammals are stressed or excited. Increased cow temperament score and elevated plasma cortisol concentrations both were associated with decreased probability of pregnancy.

These results suggest that excitable temperament and the consequent elevated cortisol concentrations are detrimental to reproductive function of cows.

These authors concluded that management strategies that improve cow disposition, enhance their immune status, and maintain the cow herd at adequate levels of nutrition, are required for optimal reproductive performance.

(Source:  Dr. Glenn Selk, Beef Extension Specialist, Oklahoma State University from Drovers Cattlenetwork, online at www.cattlenetwork.com-newletters4)

 

Educational programs of the Cooperative Extension Service serve all people regardless of race, color, sex, religion, disability or national origin.

 

1
Text Only
Lifestyles & Community
AP Video
Raw: Massive Dust Storm Covers Phoenix 12-hour Cease-fire in Gaza Fighting Begins Raw: Bolivian Dancers Attempt to Break Record Raw: Israel, Palestine Supporters Rally in US Raw: Palestinians and Israeli Soldiers Clash Raw: Air Algerie Flight 5017 Wreckage Virginia Governor Tours Tornado Aftermath Judge Faces Heat Over Offer to Help Migrant Kids Kerry: No Deal Yet on 7-Day Gaza Truce Kangaroo Goes Missing in Oklahoma More M17 Bodies Return, Sanctions on Russia Grow Gaza Residents Mourn Dead Amid Airstrikes Raw: Deadly Tornado Hits Virginia Campground Ohio State Marching Band Chief Fired After Probe Raw: Big Rig Stuck in Illinois Swamp Cumberbatch Brings 'Penguins' to Comic-Con Raw: Air Algerie Crash Site in Mali Power to Be Restored After Wash. Wildfire Crashed Air Algerie Plane Found in Mali Israel Mulls Ceasefire Amid Gaza Offensive
Hyperlocal Search
Premier Guide
Find a business

Walking Fingers
Maps, Menus, Store hours, Coupons, and more...
Premier Guide
Poll

What county fair attraction do you like most?

Amusement rides
Beauty pageants
Flora Hall craft exhibits
Horse shows
Livestock, poultry shows
Truck, tractor pulls
Mud, dirt races
Gospel sing
I like them all
     View Results