The Richmond Register

October 10, 2012

Southern receives $5K to help students access postsecondary education

By Crystal Wylie
Register News Writer

BEREA — For the second year, students from Madison Southern High School will benefit from a $5,000 KY AHED (Kentucky Appalachian Higher Education Center) grant.

The grant money is intended to help students enroll in some form of postsecondary education, whether it be a college or university, technical school, or trade or apprentice program, according to a press release by the organization.

With last year’s grant money, Southern seniors made campus visits to Spencerian College, The Lineman Training School and Somerset Community College. Juniors went to Georgetown College and sophomores went to Morehead State University, said guidance counselor Celita Eden.

“Many times, students are hindered for various reasons from visiting college campuses. These visits break down so many barriers for these students,” Eden said.

Students are better prepared and more comfortable with starting the college process if they have the opportunity to get on campus, take a tour, eat in the dining hall, see the dorms and classrooms and meet current college students, she said.

Students also spoke with admissions representatives, which prompted some of them to submit an application for admission during the trip or shortly thereafter, Eden said.

The grant also funds special speakers for evening sessions to inform parents and students about postsecondary options. These sessions are not yet planned for this year, she said.

On Oct. 19, the school will host a college fair for seniors. This event will give students an opportunity to meet individually and in small groups with an admission representative from schools where they have the most interest, Eden said.

The grant will fund a trip for the African-American Heritage Club to the Historical Black College & University College Fair in Louisville and a group of students will visit Eastern Kentucky University in the spring, she said.

The grant program was designed to address the problems facing Appalachians as related to readiness and access to higher education, the release stated.

The Appalachian Regional Commission made these funds available to Kentucky public high schools to “implement new or expanded strategies for improving both college readiness and access to college for traditional and nontraditional students,” according to the release.

Crystal Wylie can be reached at cwylie@richmondregister.com or 623-1669, ext. 6696.