The Richmond Register

Education

February 4, 2014

State community college students to pay more per hour

FRANKFORT — Kentucky’s community college students will pay more per hour beginning next fall, independent of any increases in tuition.

That assumes the General Assembly approves a plan to allow the Kentucky Community and Technical College System to finance construction projects at each of its 16 campuses through “agency bonds,” borrowing that will be financed by the colleges rather than through the state’s General Fund.

Students at the community colleges will for the first time be assessed a fee ? ultimately $8 per credit hour per student ? to help finance debt service on the bonds.

KCTCS President Michael McCall said Monday he expects the fee to be phased in over two years, beginning with a $4 fee in the fall of 2014 with an additional $4 on top of the first beginning in the fall of 2015.

Gov. Steve Beshear is proposing in the budget he’s submitting to lawmakers to allow KCTCS to fund $194 million of construction projects through a combination of $145.5 million from fees generated by the schools and the remaining 25 percent, or $48.5 million, coming from local, private investment. He and McCall, flanked by several of the campus presidents, Monday touted the proposal as “the single largest investment in the KCTCS system since it was founded in 1997.”

Among the projects are the $7.5 million renovation of the main building at Ashland CTC; $21 million for the first phase of constructing a new Postsecondary Center of Excellence at the Rowan County campus of Maysville CTC; and construction of a community intergeneration center at the Jackson campus of Hazard CTC at a cost of $1.5 million.

The building at Ashland was built in 1967, McCall said, and is in sore need of renovation. Dr. Kay Adkins, CEO of Ashland CTC, said the renovation will also allow more energy efficiency.

“We are pleased to have the opportunity for this public-private partnership to be able to upgrade the original infrastructure of the College Drive Campus main building,” Adkins said. “These upgrades will not only make the campus more comfortable for our students, faculty and staff, but the buildings will be more energy efficient as a result of the upgrades.”

McCall and the presidents on hand all said they are confident they can raise the 25 percent private portion for each of their projects.

McCall also said the proposal is “a perfect example of a public-private partnership and builds upon the strong connections our colleges have forged with their local business communities.” He said the debt won’t add to the cost of an education “in any meaningful way.”

Beshear said the construction proposal was a way to soften the impact of ongoing cuts to higher education. State funding for higher education has been cut 15 percent over the past six years and the governor is proposing another 2.5 percent cut for next year.

Tuition for KCTCS students this year is $144 per credit hour per student or $2,160 for 15 hours. That same student will have to pay an additional $60 next fall to cover the first $4 installment on the construction fee, making his tuition $2260 if tuition stays the same. The following year, he would have a $120 fee on top of tuition or a total of $2,280.

McCall and Dr. Robert King, President of the Council for Postsecondary Education, said no decision has been made about increasing tuition at community colleges next year. Data kept by the CPE indicates tuition at KCTCS campuses has increased 25.2 percent since Fiscal Year 2007/08 at an annualized rate of 3.8 percent.

During that same period, tuition at the state’s four-year public institutions has increased 36.9 percent or an annualized rate of 5.4 percent. Those data don’t include the multiple student fees charged by the four-year institutions.

Ronnie Ellis writes for CNHI News Service and is based in Frankfort. Reach him at rellis@cnhi.com. Follow CNHI News Service stories on Twitter at www.twitter.com/ cnhifrankfort.

1
Text Only
Education
  • 7-25 Camp Invention 1.jpg Young inventors turn trash to treasure

    The first day of Camp Invention began with a room full of objects ready to be recycled, Sarah Shaffer, director of the camp said Thursday.

    July 24, 2014 6 Photos

  • 7-22 Band Camp 1.jpg Band students ‛take over’ MCHS campus

    The Madison Central High School campus has been “taken over” for two weeks by 170 students attending band camp.

    July 21, 2014 6 Photos

  • 7-22 Child vs Wild Camp 3.jpg Campers learn hazards of the ‛wild’

    Fifteen “Child vs. Wild” campers crowded around a plate full of gooey marshmallows, freshly toasted by camp leaders on a St. Mark Catholic School stovetop Monday.

    July 21, 2014 3 Photos

  • MCHS, Caudill win world archery titles

    Caudill Middle School and Madison Central High School won their divisions in the National Archery in Schools Program World Championships in Madison, Wisc. this past weekend

    The win is a third consecutive title for Caudill Middle School and a first for MCHS.

    July 13, 2014

  • 7-12 White Hall principal.jpg Eversole returns to White Hall as principal

    The White Hall Elementary School-based Decision-making Council has selected Monica Eversole as the school’s new principal.
    Eversole was serving as guidance counselor at Lexington’s Dixie Magnet Elementary School.

    July 12, 2014 1 Photo

  • School board to save $53,000 yearly by refinancing bonds

    The Madison County School Board authorized issuance of almost $10.5 million in school building revenue bonds at its monthly meeting Thursday.
    The board approved a recommendation from the Madison County School District Finance Corporation to issue slightly more than $10.49 million in bonds to help finance renovation projects at three district elementary schools.

    July 12, 2014

  • Madison Kindergarten Academy at Mayfield

    The kindergarten center that will serve the county’s four Richmond elementary schools will be known as the Madison Kindergarten Academy at Mayfield.
    The Madison County School Board at its monthly meeting Thursday night chose the name for the all-kindergarten academy that will be housed in the former Mayfield Elementary School.

    July 10, 2014

  • Naming of kindergarten academy on school board agenda

    Naming of the new kindergarten academy to be housed in the former Mayfield Elementary School building is on the Madison County School Board’s agenda Thursday evening.
    The meeting will begin at 6 p.m. in the Madison Central High School lecture lab.

    July 8, 2014

  • Bluegrass Christian School closes

    Bluegrass Christian School did not get enough enrollment contracts by June 30, and its board of directors has decided to cease operations.
    The school will be dissolved Aug. 1., according to a Tuesday statement from the six-member board.
    Families may pick up transcripts, records and prepaid tuition or application fees the week of July 21, from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., the statement added.

    July 2, 2014

  • County schools may rent EKU Center at cost

    The EKU Center for the Arts will allow Madison County Schools to rent space at the center’s cost, its community operations board decided Thursday.
    At-cost rental has always been available for university events, but Thursday’s vote extended it to the county school district, Joel Aalberts, EKU Center director, said Friday.

    June 27, 2014

AP Video
Kerry: Humanitarian Cease-fire Efforts Continue Raw: Corruption Trial Begins for Former Va Gov. The Carbon Trap: US Exports Global Warming UN Security Council Calls for Gaza Cease-fire Traditional African Dishes Teach Healthy Eating 13 Struck by Lightning on Calif. Beach Baseball Hall of Famers Inducted Israel, Hamas Trade Fire Despite Truce in Gaza Italy's Nibali Set to Win First Tour De France Raw: Shipwrecked Concordia Completes Last Voyage Raw: Sea Turtle Hatchlings Emerge From Nest Raw: Massive Dust Storm Covers Phoenix 12-hour Cease-fire in Gaza Fighting Begins Raw: Bolivian Dancers Attempt to Break Record Raw: Israel, Palestine Supporters Rally in US Raw: Air Algerie Flight 5017 Wreckage Virginia Governor Tours Tornado Aftermath Judge Faces Heat Over Offer to Help Migrant Kids Kangaroo Goes Missing in Oklahoma More M17 Bodies Return, Sanctions on Russia Grow
Hyperlocal Search
Premier Guide
Find a business

Walking Fingers
Maps, Menus, Store hours, Coupons, and more...
Premier Guide
Poll

Should Madison County’s three local governing bodies ban smoking in indoor public places?

Yes
No
     View Results