The Richmond Register

March 4, 2013

White pleads guilty but mentally ill in death of sister

Rockcastle County Detention Center for


Register staff report

MADISON COUNTY —

The brother of Dorothy “Dot” Whitaker pleaded guilty but mentally ill Monday to a charge of second-degree manslaughter in her August 2011 death.

If the recommended sentence of 10 years is imposed at an April 26 sentencing, Clyde White, 79, of Corbin, could be parole eligible by September.

Under Kentucky law, a prisoner can be paroled after serving 20 percent of a second-degree manslaughter sentence. Because he has been held in the Rockcastle County Detention Center for more than 18 months, White could be parole eligible after Aug. 29.

White originally was charged with attempted murder and two counts of wanton endangerment. He entered the plea in Rockcastle Circuit Court, according to Stacy Akers, chief paralegal for the 28th Judicial Circuit Commonwealth’s Attorney’s office in Somerset.

Assistant Commonwealth’s Attorney Jeremy Bartley recommended White be given the maximum 10-year sentence on the charge. If White had been convicted of the more serious original charge, he could have faced up to 20 years in prison.

Police say White pursued the van in which Whitaker, 83, was riding in along Interstate 75 the morning of August 29, 2011, ramming it repeatedly with his vehicle until it ran off the road in Rockcastle County.

Lawrence White, Whitaker and Clyde White’s brother, was driving the van. Both he and Whitaker were airlifted to the University of Kentucky Medical Center where Whitaker died the next day.

Clyde White was uninjured and attempted to flee on foot from police after the crash on KY 461. Lawrence White survived, according to a Kentucky State Police report after the incident.

Dorothy Whitaker, an active member of Richmond’s First Christian Church, was well-known and well-liked in the community. For many years, she conducted the silent auction for the church’s popular Christmas bazaar.