The Richmond Register

February 8, 2013

Man indicted on meth charges, police say child was present

By Ronica Shannon
Senior News Writer

RICHMOND — A man who police say was making meth in the presence of a child was indicted this week by a Madison grand jury.

Lucas W. Shanks, 26, was indicted on charges of manufacturing methamphetamine, fourth-degree controlled substance endangerment to a child and second-degree persistent felony offender. If convicted, Shanks could receive a maximum of life in prison.

Shanks was arrested Jan. 8 by Richmond police who say he was making meth inside his apartment on Ballard Drive.

During a search, officers found a shotgun and ammunition, according to a press release from Richmond Police Chief Larry Brock.

Shanks was charged with possession of a firearm by a convicted felon after police discovered he had been convicted of felony theft in Madison Circuit Court, the released added. However, the grand jury did not indict Shanks on that charge.

Shanks remains in the Madison County Detention Center on a $10,000 cash bond, according to online jail records.

Other indictments:

• Allison Barnard, two counts of second-degree criminal possession of a forged instrument. If convicted, Barnard could face a maximum sentence of 10 years in prison.

• James Darren Sturgill and Sandra Faye Sturgill, three counts of first-degree possession of a controlled substance, two counts of second-degree possession of a controlled substance and possession of drug paraphernalia.

• David Back II, first-degree possession of a controlled substance.

• Jonathan E. Decoster, theft by unlawful taking. If convicted, Decoster could serve up to five years in prison.

• Conley Jones, third-degree burglary and first-degree persistent felony offender. If convicted, Jones could serve up to 20 years in prison.

• Stephon Miller, two counts of flagrant nonsupport and second-degree persistent felony offender. If convicted, Miller could serve up to 20 years in prison.

• Thomas Smallwood, flagrant nonsupport. If convicted, he could serve up to five years in prison.

More indictments will be listed in Sunday's newspaper.

An indictment is a formal statement of charges and does not imply guilt, only that a grand jury believes the state has enough evident to prosecute. See Sunday’s Richmond Register for the remaining indictments from Madison Circuit Court.